Posts Tagged ‘longboard’

English: Two inlineskates wheels; Bont High Ro...

English: Two inlineskates wheels; Bont High Roller G4 110mm 85A, and 83A. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

 

This is next part in Skateboards Parts series.

 

Wheels

 

The wheels of a skateboard, usually made of polyurethane, come in many different sizes and shapes to suit different types of skating. Larger sizes like 54–85 mm roll faster, and move more easily over cracks in pavement. Smaller sizes like 48–54 mm keep the board closer to the ground, require less force to accelerate and produce a lower center of gravity, but also make for a slower top speed. Wheels also are available in a variety of hardnesses usually measured on the Shore durometer “A” scale. Wheels range from the very soft (about Shore A 75) to the very hard (about Shore A 101). As the A scale stops at 100, any wheels labeled 101A or higher are harder, but do not use the appropriate durometer scale. Some wheel manufacturers now use the “B” or “D” scales, which have a larger and more accurate range of hardness. Modern street skaters prefer smaller wheels (usually 51–54 mm), as small wheels with lighter trucks can make tricks like kickflips and other flip tricks easier by keeping the center of gravity of the skateboard closer to the deck, thus making the deck easier to spin. Street wheels are softer. Vertical ramp or “vert” skating requires larger wheels (usually 55–65 mm), as it involves higher speeds. Vert wheels are also usually harder, allowing them to maintain high speed on ramps without sliding. Slalom skating requires even larger wheels (60–75 mm) to sustain the highest speeds possible. They also need to be soft and have better grip to make the tight and frequent turns in slalom racing. Even larger wheels are used in longboarding and downhill skateboarding. Sizes range from 65 mm to 100 mm. These extreme sizes of wheels almost always have cores of hard plastic that can be made thinner and lighter than a solid polyurethane wheel. They are often used by skateboard videographers as well, as the large soft wheels allow for smooth and easy movement over any terrain.

 

To get best wheels try visiting skatesusa.com.

 

This is next part in Skateboards Parts series.

Trucks

An Independent brand skateboard truck

Attached to the deck are two metal (usually aluminum alloy) trucks, which connect to the wheels and deck. The trucks are further composed of two parts. The top part of the truck is screwed to the deck and is called the baseplate, and beneath it is the hanger. The axle runs through the hanger. Between the baseplate and the hanger are bushings, also rubbers or grommets, that provide the cushion mechanism for turning the skateboard. The bushings cushion the truck when it turns. The stiffer the bushings, the more resistant the skateboard is to turning. The softer the bushings, the easier it is to turn. A bolt called a kingpin holds these parts together and fits inside the bushings. Thus by tightening or loosening the kingpin nut, the trucks can be adjusted loosely for better turning and tighter for more stability. Standard Kingpin nut size is 3/8″ – 24tpi.

Skateboard trucks are manufactured in a number of different axle widths. In general an axle width should be chosen that is close to the width of the deck it will be used with. For example, a 7.75″ wide deck will usually be fitted with trucks that have axles between 7.5″ wide and 8.0″ wide. (Standard truck axel nut size is 5/16″-24tpi UNF, and the thinner “jam” style with an optional nylon lock.) Trucks that are too wide can make doing tricks difficult and can cause the wheels to get in the way when the skateboard is being ridden. Trucks that are too small can be hard to maintain stability and can cause wheel bite to occur when turning.

Longboard specific trucks are a more recent development. A longboard truck has the king pin laid at a more obtuse angle (usually between 38 and 50 degrees) to the deck, this gives a greater degree of turning for the same tilt of the deck. This allows riders to go much faster while still maintaining stability and control.

Giant strides have been made in the truck industry over the years. In late 2007, Gullwing Truck Company manufactured a truck named “Sidewinder” that can pivot on two different angles, thus greatly decreasing the turning radius of the board, resulting in a greater feel between the rider and the sidewalk.

To get best trucks you can see http://www.skatesusa.com/skateboarding/skateboard-parts/skateboard-trucks

With the evolution of skateparks and ramp skating, the skateboard began to change. Early skate tricks had consisted mainly of two-dimensional manoeuvres like riding on only two wheels (“wheelie” or “manual”), spinning only on the back wheels (a “pivot”), high jumping over a bar and landing on the board again, also known as a “hippie jump”, long jumping from one board to another, (often over small barrels or fearless teenagers), or slalom. Another popular trick was the Bertlemann slide, named after Larry Bertelemann’s surfing manoeuvres.

In 1976, skateboarding was transformed by the invention of the ollie by Alan “Ollie” Gelfand. It remained largely a unique Florida trick until the summer of 1978, when Gelfand made his first visit to California. Gelfand and his revolutionary maneuvers caught the attention of the West Coast skaters and the media where it began to spread worldwide. The ollie was adapted to flat ground by Rodney Mullen in 1982. Mullen also invented the “Magic Flip,” which was later renamed the kickflip, as well many other tricks including, the 360 kickflip, which is a 360 pop shove it and a kickflip in the same motion. The flat ground ollie allowed skateboarders to perform tricks in mid-air without any more equipment than the skateboard itself, it has formed the basis of many street skating tricks. A recent development in the world of trick skating is the 1080, which was first ever landed by Tom Schaar in 2012.

[Ref: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Skateboarding#Trick_skating%5D

Original Complete Manhattan 27

Original Complete Manhattan 27:

 

About the The Manhattan 27 Longboard

The Manhattan takes ultra tight mini longboard carving to your streets, in the city or otherwise. Ideal for kids, or any small rider, advanced surf skaters will also have a blast. The Manhattan lets you easily carry your longboard skateboard where ever it is that you are heading. Where else will you find a longboard that fits in the overhead carry on compartment.

 

Comes complete with the following parts:

  • Original S6 (150mm) longboard trucks
  • Kryptonics 65mm 78a (Red) wheels
  • Abec 3 (Speedlubed) bearings

http://www.skatesusa.com/original-complete-manhattan-27-CMANT01WK6

Revenge Alpha II - 175mm Longboard Trucks (pair)

Revenge Alpha II – 175mm Longboard Trucks (pair)

 

 

Specifications

The Revenge Alpha II is a single pivot 45° torsion truck made of 8DC12 recycle-based lead free aluminum. They are designed for carving, sidewalk surfing and for the pure thrill of turning. They are not intended to replace your conventional trucks for the skatepark. Revenge trucks are too performance oriented for traditional transition-based skateboarding.

The patented external locking mechanism allows for the tightest turns with no need for riser pads even with wheels up to 73mm, resulting in a full circle on a 47″ board in less than 8 feet, all with no wheel bite! Turning has never been easier.

They are mountable with standard hardware along with two options for hole patterns, old school and new school.

The bushing is made from the highest quality high impact polyurethane, made in the USA.

http://www.skatesusa.com/revenge-alpha-II-175mm-longboard-trucks-REVAII

Landyachtz Longboard Skateboard Wheels Zombie Hawgs 76mm 82a (Set of 4)- yellow

Landyachtz Longboard Skateboard Wheels Zombie Hawgs 76mm 82a (Set of 4)- yellow:

we’ve killed the Zombie is 100% deadly.  Built on a large 42mm injection molded core Zombie’s roll super quick, ideal for hunting down useless humans.  The newest member of the Hawgs family is truely sideset with the inner edge of the bearing perfectly aligned with the inner edge of the wheel.  The Zombie’s  sideset stance and round edges make for a super smooth transition from gripping a carve to throwing a slide.  With a contact patch of 33mm there’s enough resistance to slow you down during a slide while the rounded edges make for a predictable drift.  After scratching their backs on tombstones, the Zombies come to you with a stone ground finish making them easy to rip as soon as you get your hands on them.    Whether you’re freeriding or ripping around town; Shred the Dead. ZOMBIES!!!!

http://www.skatesusa.com/landyachtz-longboard-skateboard-wheels-zombie-hawgs-76mm-82a-yellow-HZYEL76

Original Complete Derringer 28

Original Complete Derringer 28:

 

Comes Complete with:

  • Original S6 (150mm) longboard trucks ,Kryptonics 76mm 78a , wheels ,Abec 3 (Speedlubed) bearings

 

Performance carving, all dialed in.

The Derringer is our smallest all-around carving longboard. Owing to it’s surf roots the Derringer excels at generating powerful-carves at slow speeds turning flatland and small hills into rippable, enjoyable, runs. Your mini longboard can be more than just transportation, and it doesn’t have to be cheap plastic. The high end, high performance, bi-axial fiberglass, hot pressed into every Derringer, ignites a lively flex and power through the turns that the damp give of maple alone (or waffle molded plastic) just can’t match. If you love the idea of a small board, but demand big board carving performance, the Derringer stands alone.

http://www.skatesusa.com/original-complete-derringer-28

Landyachtz- Drop Speed Complete Longboard

 

Landyachtz- Drop Speed Complete Longboard: Comes Complete with the Following parts- Bear Grizzly 8/52 Trucks, 70mm Mini Monster wheels and LY Abec7 bearings

 

 

 

Symmetry is a beautiful thing, with no front or back this is a downhill board that loves to freeride. The Dropspeed is stable enough to charge down a mountain pass and nimble enough to dodge pedestrians on the sidewalk this is a board that can truly do it all.

 

-Drop mounted, providing a more stable ride and making it easier to push and foot-break

 

-Symmetrical design giving the board no front or back.

 

-Bold “W” concave locks your feet to the board and keeps them comfortable for long rides

 

-9 plies of Canadian Maple making the board stiff and durable

 

Artwork by Brian Luong

http://www.skatesusa.com/landyachtz-drop-speed-complete-longboard-acf11f

Here is the next post on history of skateboarding. In last post we talked about 1940-1960s era. In this post we are talking about 1970s era. And in coming posts we will be talking about 1980s and 1990s to present.

In the early 1970s, Frank Nasworthy started to develop a skateboard wheel made of polyurethane, calling his company Cadillac Wheels. Prior to this new material, skateboards wheels were metal or “clay” wheels. The improvement in traction and performance was so immense that from the wheel’s release in 1972 the popularity of skateboarding started to rise rapidly again, causing companies to invest more in product development. Nasworthy commissioned artist Jim Evans to do a series of paintings promoting Cadillac Wheels, they were featured as ads and posters in the resurrected Skateborder magazine, and proved immensely popular in promoting the new style of skateboarding. Many companies started to manufacture trucks (axles) specially designed for skateboarding, reached in 1976 by Tracker Trucks. As the equipment became more maneuverable, the decks started to get wider, reaching widths of 10 inches (250 mm) and over, thus giving the skateboarder even more control. Banana board is a term used to describe skateboards made of polypropylene that were skinny, flexible, with ribs on the underside for structural support and very popular during the mid-1970s. They were available in myriad colors, bright yellow probably being the most memorable, hence the name.

Manufacturers started to experiment with more exotic composites and metals, like fiberglass and aluminium, but the common skateboards were made of maple plywood. The skateboarders took advantage of the improved handling of their skateboards and started inventing new tricks. Skateboarders, most notably Ty Page, Bruce Logan, Bobby Piercy, Kevin Reed, and the Z-Boys (so-called because of their local Zephyr surf shop) started to skate the vertical walls of swimming pools that were left empty in the 1976 California drought. This started the vert trend in skateboarding. With increased control, vert skaters could skate faster and perform more dangerous tricks, such as slash grinds and frontside/backside airs. This caused liability concerns and increased insurance costs to skatepark owners, and the development (first by Norcon,then more successfully by Rector) of improved knee pads that had a hard sliding cap and strong strapping proved to be too-little-too-late. During this era, the “freestyle” movement in skateboarding began to splinter off and develop into a much more specialized discipline, characterized by the development of a wide assortment of flat-ground tricks.

As a result of the “vert” skating movement, skate parks had to contend with high-liability costs that led to many park closures. In response, vert skaters started making their own ramps, while freestyle skaters continued to evolve their flatland style. Thus by the beginning of the 1980s, skateboarding had once again declined in popularity.

Skateboarding is an action sport which involves riding and performing tricks using a skateboard. A person who skateboards is most often referred to as a skateboarder, or colloquially within the skateboarding community, a skater.

Skates USA is posting some articles about the history of skateboarding for interest of its followers. So here it is.

Skateboarding was probably born sometime in the late 1940s or early 1950s when surfers in California wanted something to surf when the waves were flat. No one knows who made the first board; it seems that several people came up with similar ideas at around the same time. These first skateboarders started with wooden boxes or boards with roller skate wheels attached to the bottom. The boxes turned into planks, and eventually companies were producing decks of pressed layers of wood – similar to the skateboard decks of today. During this time, skateboarding was seen as something to do for fun besides surfing, and was therefore often referred to as “Sidewalk Surfing”.

A skateboarder in Tallahassee, Florida

The first manufactured skateboards were ordered by a Los Angeles, California surf shop, meant to be used by surfers in their downtime. The shop owner, Bill Richard, made a deal with the Chicago Roller Skate Company to produce sets of skate wheels, which they attached to square wooden boards. Accordingly, skateboarding was originally denoted “sidewalk surfing” and early skaters emulated surfing style and maneuvers. Crate scooters preceded skateboards, and were borne of a similar concept, with the exception of having a wooden crate attached to the nose (front of the board), which formed rudimentary handlebars.

A number of surfing manufacturers such as Makaha started building skateboards that resembled small surfboards, and assembling teams to promote their products. The popularity of skateboarding at this time spawned a national magazine, Skateboarder Magazine, and the 1965 international championships were broadcast on national television. The growth of the sport during this period can also be seen in sales figures for Makaha, which quoted $10 million worth of board sales between 1963 and 1965 (Weyland, 2002:28). Yet by 1966 the sales had dropped significantly (ibid) and Skateboarder Magazine had stopped publication. The popularity of skateboarding dropped and remained low until the early 1970s.

[The source for this post is Wikipedia.]